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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the cocoa plant. by the 1880s, big companies, what we called big pharma, were calling it big dos. by then, the secret was out. >> it was the miracle drug. if you had a stomach ache or you needed interest. if you had tuberculosis or asthma. if you had all sorts of things, it was going to cure what you had. this was how it was advertised. >> for the park davis company, cocaine was a blockbuster. others sold it, too. one popular product was vi vin mariani. endorsed by thomas edison, queen victoria. french bordeau with six ounces of cocaine in every bottle. then a copy cat wine. >> the great mother of invention. he took cola nuts and syrup and made the refreshing drink we call coca-cola. >> he wrote in an 1895 letter. >> i need a lot of cocaine. >> he finally stopped using it after he and a friend of his used cocaine on a patient and nearly killed her. >> by then, other doctors worried, too. >> too many people were taking too much cocaine and they were presenting as addicts who needed the stuff. they could not live without it. that is when doctors began to say, huh, we better rethink this. >>
. they inspired him to kick his habit of soda and fast food and do something big, start training for the not not akau new york city triathlon. he's leaner, faster and healthier than he's ever been before and joins us from outside his home in orlando. good to see you again. you look great. we've had a chance to catch up a few times. knowing how close you are to your kids it's amazing that one of the biggest breakthroughs you experienced in this challenge happened on father's day. tell us what happened, specifically. >> yeah. on father's day weekend, i entered a race, and for viewers that don't know what that is, it's kind of like a triathlon except limited to two sports, a run, a bike and a run at the end. and it was an amazing experience because it was the first time i got to really test myself with all the training i had done and i learned a lot. >> one of the things i've talked about and talked about with you and others, when i decided to do a triathlon it changed my life in ways i could not have imagined not just in terms of fitness and health but in other ways as well. what h
of the kids at children's hospitals. congress member michael burgess is a big backer of programs to train pediatric specialists. with medicaid, we are facing tough choices. >> it will require more money. that more money will come from somewhere. does that mean a lessening of benefits for people on the program currently and evening out? when you have a finite number of resources, something has to give. >> that is a reminder that the budget negotiations you hear about involve lots of choices and numbers. there are real people behind the numbers like mimi and max. >>> coming up, a decision affecting workers who say they got sick in cases after they rushed to help after the world trade center collapse on 9/11. t. he's low fat, too, and has 5 grams of sugars. i'll believe it when i--- [ both ] oooooh... what's shakin'? [ female announcer ] as you get older, protein is an important part of staying active and strong. new ensure high protein... fifty percent of your daily value of protein. low fat and five grams of sugars. see? he's a good egg. [ major nutrition ] new ensure high protein. ensure!
. >> the battlefields. interesting because you still see it, you know, in daily life at big hospitals. but also even on the battlefields they've started taking medical commodities, these forward tentsz and moving them forward for that same reason. there's been a lot of lessons more recently from iraq and afghanistan. you've been talking to people about that. >> what doctors are telling us, and it's sad to think but it's a basic fact, tens of thousands have been wounded in this war. so you have this giant population that they are learning from. and what they're basically learning they will tell you, i think, is dynamic innovative, fast-moving medical care. try new things. try and see what you can accomplish with new techniques, new procedures, because they can't stick to just the old way of doing business. these kids are coming back with traumatic injuries that are very, very tough. they got to find a way to deal with them. and you find doctors and nurses out there trying new things. things that may be in your emergency room not too far from them. >> i'm not quite sure how to say this but i think on
now getting ready to deploy. for these men and women heading off to war, a big city hospital like the one where i work, can be a perfect training ground. >> reporter: dr. john renshaw stops to check on one of his patients. he suffered massive injuries at his job when he was caught in a conveyer belt. his cousin translates into their native haiti. renshaw is an oncologist. he treats cancer. why is he here? dr. john renshaw is major john renshaw, united states air force. he's deploying to the front lines of afghanistan to treat the war wound. but before he goes, he along with other military medical personnel will complete a tour of duty here at the university of maryland shock trauma center in baltimore. sharpening their ability to deal with critical trauma patients. >> the wounds appear to be superficial. >> category "a" now. >> trauma. >> trooper one. 15 up, 10 minutes back, fall from tree. category "a," priority 1. >> every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled into these bays. some are accident victims. this young man came with multiple stab wounds. but right alongside the
, heading off to war, a big city hospital like the one where i work, can be a perfect training ground. >> this doctor stops to check on an injured patient. he suffered massive abdominal injuries at the maryland factory job when he was caught in a conveyer belt. >> we will keep an eye on that. >> his cousin peter translates into the creole of their native haiti. but rimshaw treats cancer. why is he here? dr. john renshaw is deploying to the frontlines of stafghanistano treat the war wounded. before he goes, he along with other medical personnel, will complete a tour at the university of maryland trauma center in baltimore. sharpening their ability to deal with critical trauma patients. >> the worunds appear to be superfici superficial. >> trauma. >> trooper one. 15 up. ten minutes back. category a. priority one. >> every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled into the bays. some are accident victims. this young man came with multiple stab wounds. right alongside the civilian trauma doctors, nurses and techs and military personnel. >> the injuries that i treated here are the closest
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)